Monday , April 24 2017
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Publications

ACJPS regularly produces a range of high quality, evidence-based publications.

Building on a Cracked Foundation

On 1 November 2009, registration for national elections slated to be held in April 2010 began throughout Sudan. Originally intended to end on 30 November, the process was extended one week until 7 December as many election stakeholders requested the National Elections Commission (NEC) to extend the registration period. The registration – a critical first step in the electoral process – occurred against the backdrop of a contentious political environment marked by political obstruction of peaceful political activities and human rights abuses, and an overall tightening of restrictions on civil and political freedoms. According to the NEC, at least 75.8% of eligible Sudanese were registered, which was quite close to the national target of 80%. This aggregate figure represents a 71% rate of registration of the eligible electorate in the North, and 98% in the South, respectively.1 The accuracy of these statistics, however, is thrown into doubt by dispute over the results of the 2008 census, which forms the basis of the estimation of potential voters. In South Sudan, there was particular pressure to register as a means of compensating for, or disputing, census figures which were felt to grossly underestimate the population of the South. Some of the states in the South have exceeded in registering over 100 % of eligible voters, according to the census.

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SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR ISSUE 5

SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR DECEMBER 2009 – MAY 2010 Feature: Post-Election Repression Unchecked On 26 April, the National Elections Commission (NEC) announced that the incumbent President Omar al-Bashir had been re-elected by a 68.24 majority. In the North, National Congress Party (NCP) candidates at local and parliamentary levels were elected …

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SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR ISSUE 4

SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 2009 Overview The two months of this reporting period saw considerable movement at the political level. The release of the Mbeki Panel report can be seen as the culmination of months of AU engagement – and the findings represent a new opportunity to build international …

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SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR ISSUE 3

SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2009 Law Reform in Sudan Overview Under the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) and the Sudanese interim constitution, law reform is seen as a critical element of the planned    political    transformation. Under the agreement, all national laws were to be reviewed and amended in such a …

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SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR ISSUE 2

SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR JUNE-JULY 2009 Feature The arrest of Lubna Hussein, a journalist and a public information officer at the UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) has thrust Sudan’s public order legislation into the spotlight Ms. Hussien was arrested on 3 July 2009 along with 12 other girls and charged …

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SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR ISSUE 1

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January 2009 marked the fourth anniversary of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between Khartoum’s National Congress Party (NCP) and the southern rebel Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement (SPLM). That agreement set out a six year interim period during which it was envisaged that comprehensive democratic reform would be undertaken. With two thirds of the interim period passed, it had been envisaged that the package of legal reforms would have been implemented and that the country would be moving towards free and fair elections no later than July 2009.

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