Sunday , February 18 2018
aren

Excessive and Deadly: the Use of Disproportionate Force, Arbitrary Detention and Torture against Protestors in Sudan

(3 September 2014) Excessive and Deadly: The use of disproportionate force, arbitrary detention and torture against protestors in Sudan is a joint report by Amnesty International and the African Centre for Justice and Peace Studies (ACJPS).

Over the past two years, a deteriorating economy and other austerity measures have fuelled popular discontent amongst the Sudanese people, leading to a surge in demonstrations across the country. The response to the demonstrations by security services has been a recurring concern for Amnesty International and ACJPS. The government continues to use a number of tactics to stifle dissent such as the criminalisation of the exercise of freedoms of expression and assembly, excessive use of force (including with live ammunition), arbitrary detention, torture and other forms of ill-treatment.

By examining allegations of human rights violations committed by the security services in Sudan during protests that took place in South Darfur and Al Jazeera states in 2012, country-wide protests in September and October 2013 and protests at the University of Khartoum in March 2014, this report demonstrates that the police, the National Intelligence and Security Services, and other security forces have repeatedly violated their obligations under international law and the Sudanese Constitution, resulting in a series of unlawful killings and injuries to civilians. Furthermore, this report highlights the Government’s failure to ensure the conduct of thorough, impartial and independent investigations, perpetuating impunity and thus hindering deterrence.

The report is dedicated to the memory of the late Osman Hummaida, Founding Director of ACJPS and a human rights defender who fought tirelessly to obtain justice for victims of human rights violations in Sudan and hold perpetrators to account.

Read the full report here.

Sudanese protestors demonstrate in Khartoum's twin city of Omdurman after the government announced steep price rises for petroleum products after suspending state subsidies as part of crucial economic reforms on September 25, 2013.
Sudanese protestors demonstrate in Khartoum’s twin city of Omdurman after the government announced steep price rises for petroleum products after suspending state subsidies as part of crucial economic reforms on September 25, 2013.